In the mind’s ultimate state there is nothing to bring into the mind, no faults or mistakes to dispel.

— Maitreya

The noble Bodhisattvas eliminate the suffering of dying, falling ill, and aging at its root, which is due to karma and the afflicted emotions. There being no such cause, there is no such consequence.

— Maitreya

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One who hears but one word of this and, having heard, has faith in it, will attain greater virtue than that of the meditative stability of others whose dhyana rids the three worlds of defilements’ fires and brings achievement of the divine state of Brahma’s paradise, even if it is practised as a means to supreme immutable enlightenment. Generosity brings affluence, right conduct leads to the higher states, meditative stability removes defilements, but prajna [wisdom] removes all defilements and the cognitive. Therefore this prajna is the most excellent thing: its cause is to study such as this.

— Maitreya

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They taught this in order to eliminate the five faults in those in whom they exist. These are faint heartedness, contempt for inferior sentient beings, clinging to what is not actual, deprecating the actual dharma, and excessive attachment to oneself.

— Maitreya

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In the earth beneath a poor person’s home, there may be an inexhaustible treasure, but that person does not know of it, and the treasure does not exclaim, “I am here!” Likewise, with the stainless treasure contained within the mind — the dharma that is inconceivable and without decay — not being realized, the suffering of being destitute is continuously experienced by all beings in many ways.

— Maitreya, Uttaratantra

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